There is said to be over a million in excess housing supply presently in Turkey. Though Turkey at present does not seem to be under threat of a real estate bubble due to an oversupply of housing, there appears to be a mismatch between demand and supply. While low-income families need an annual supply of 72,000 units, there is an oversupply of around 24,000 in luxury housing [yeniemlak.com, 23/6/2014]. These uninhabited housing estates/gated communities are some of the few in the area I lived at the time, in Urla, Izmir.

The gated community where I rented was a co-operative, a provision model that at one time was prolific but has in recent years been undermined by the development of mass housing projects such as TOKI. Half the houses were empty, some only built to the bare fundamentals, while the ghost owners presumably continued to pay the high-end monthly maintenance fee that also covered pool and gardening facilities. There were many other gated communities scattered in the area, where there was no public transport and only one recently paved main road: I was told that one construction was stopped eight years ago. I liked to peruse these empty homes which in their unoccupied state triggered a kind of reverse nostalgia, not to mention not at all feeling like the family-friendly, safe places gated communities are usually advertised to be, now more than ever in today's "new" neoliberal Turkey.

Exhibition views BERLINARTPROJECTS (2016) and Istanbul Modern (2015-16)